What I’m Reading – Week of April 11th

* How To Avoid Half-Heartedness:

“If you want to be loved, find something you love. People can sense it when you have something dedicated to. No one wants the burden of being the answer to your dissatisfaction.”

* The Big Lessons Of Last Year:

“The big lesson is to realize that you will again be hit by things you didn’t see coming, that no one was talking about, and that will move the needle more than all the things you expected to happen combined.”

* A Lot Of The Woo Probably Works:

“We’re beginning to re-examine some of these hidden assumptions, which is why there even is research on meditation, yoga, and other formerly woo-woo Eastern practices.”

* The Multidisciplinary Approach to Thinking (Audio):

“There may be no better formula for living the best life you could possibly live.”

What I’m Reading – Week of March 21st

* Avoiding Bad Decisions: “Our evolutionary programming conditions us to do what’s easy over what’s right. After all, it’s often easier to signal being virtuous than to actually be virtuous.”

* Pure Downside, No Silver Lining: “Pessimism is usually just extrapolating bad events without considering the offsetting reactions that push things in the other direction. That’s why it’s often wrong.”

* On Going Deep Versus Going Broad: “Depth wasn’t so much a game of persistently striving to top myself, it was more like a new lens for looking at the tools and opportunities that had always been there.”

* On Being Alone: “I don’t believe it’s a sign of weakness to feel lonely.”

What I’m Reading – Week of March 8th

* The Velocity of Skill Development: “Focused repetitions give you feedback. Feedback makes you better. Each repetition builds upon the ones you’ve already done. This is how greatness happens.”

* Good And Bad Procrastination: “I think the way to “solve” the problem of procrastination is to let delight pull you instead of making a to-do list push you.”

* Goldilocks of Giving: “I encourage everyone to accept themselves and to accept others as they are. However, true growth comes from having a continuous and honest conversation with yourself. Self-evaluation can guide your path, and help you bloom.”

* The Science Behind Journaling: “By knowing who we were, it’s easier for us to reflect on who we want to become, providing us a clearer picture of the future and allowing us to map out exactly how to get there based on all that we’ve learned from before until now.”

My Interview on The Mindset Horizon Podcast

Episode #104 – Cultivating Resilience and Manifesting Your Legacy:

1 – Learn more about the ups and downs of career transitions and how to overcome impostor syndrome.
2 – Learn how to cultivate a resilient mindset.
3 – Learn how to manifest your vision and legacy.

What I’m Reading – The Week of February 21st

* How to Do the Things You Keep Avoiding: “Tasks you’re avoiding never leave your consciousness for long. They hang there like clouds, some distance away, watching you.”

* Solve Problems Before They Happen: “It’s worth asking why, if we think something is worth saving, we don’t put more effort into protecting it ahead of time.”

* Best Story Wins: “Not who has the best idea, or the right answer. Just whoever tells a story that catches people’s attention and gets them to nod their heads.”

What I’m Reading: The Week of February 7th

* On Regret: “We all have joys, hopes, fears, and longings that never go away no matter how old we get.”

* How To Be Angry: “At its core, your anger is telling you that there’s a problem. One way to productively express it is to use the energy it provides to solve that problem.”

* The Days Are Long But The Decades Are Short: “A friend asked me if I’d figured out any life advice in the past decade worth passing on.”

* The High Price Of Mistrust: “Right now, polarization and social distancing have forced us apart from any sense of community to a degree that can seem irresolvable.”

The Biggest Mistakes People Make When Setting Goals

The three biggest mistakes I see made when setting goals are: 1. Individuals lack proper motivation to do the work necessary because they think of outcomes in terms of accomplishing their goals instead of the consequences of not accomplishing them. 2. Lack of defined filters to determine if a goal is in fact a goal … Read more